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Nut to nut unequal. Which species are the healthiest and which have the fewest calories?

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Nuts are a tasty and healthy snack. It is worth including them in your daily diet, as they benefit our health thanks to their nutritional values.

However, a nut is not the same as a nut, and each species is characterized by a slightly different content of healthy substances. So which ones are worth eating most often, and which ones are better to avoid? We suggest!

Nuts and fat content

Due to their high fat content, nutritionists recommend eating nuts no more than a few times a week, one handful at a time. Macadamia nuts are the most rich in fat, followed closely by Brazil nuts, pecans and coconuts.

Almonds

Almonds have earned the nickname “royal nuts.” They consist of 20% protein. They are also high in iron, which helps reduce stress. Almonds are also worth reaching for because of the vitamins E and B12 found in them, which are essential for the proper functioning of the skin and delay the aging process.

Cashews

Cashew nuts contain a fair amount of protein, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc and iron. In this respect, they win over all other kinds of nuts. Their shell has strong steaming properties, so cashews are roasted even before the shell is removed. They have a soft, subtle, slightly sweet flesh – that’s why cashew nuts are most often eaten without any processing.

Walnuts

Due to their high protein content, walnuts are an important component of a vegetarian diet. They are also a source of polyunsaturated fatty acids, including omega-3. Just 3 walnuts are enough to provide the daily requirement of this nutrient.

Hazelnuts

According to studies, monounsaturated fatty acids have the property of lowering the level of “bad cholesterol”. This very valuable nutrient is found precisely in hazelnuts. They are also rich in vitamin E and folic acid.

Pistachios

Pistachio nuts are rich in protein, beta-carotene, potassium, vitamin B6 and B1. Much healthier are unroasted pistachios, which are unfortunately more difficult to get in stores. Roasting reduces the antioxidant content by up to half, so our body is less protected against oxidative stress.

Peanuts

Peanuts, also known as fistas, are distinguished by their record content of vitamin B3, a deficiency of which can cause pelagra, a disease to which alcohol abusers are particularly prone. The healthiest nuts are, of course, in-shell. Roasted or salted ones are, unfortunately, much more caloric.

Pecan nuts

Pecan nuts, due to their high fat content, are very caloric. Instead, they are a rich source of zinc. In shape they are similar to walnuts, but in taste they are sweeter and more buttery. They are added to cakes and creams, thus giving them a delicate spicy flavor.

Macadamia nuts

Similar to pecans, macadamia nuts are very caloric. They contain a large amount of monounsaturated fatty acids. According to studies, eating macadamia nuts lowers the risk of thrombosis and coronary heart disease.

Pine nuts

Pine nuts are included in the famous pesto sauce. They contain little protein, and thanks to their fatty acids, they lower blood cholesterol levels. They are also rich in zinc and magnesium. They can be used to relieve inflammation and for dry coughs. However, it’s not worth buying them in stock, as they fade quickly, and they are one of the world’s most expensive nuts.

main photo: unsplash.com/Towfiqu barbhuiya

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